Inadequate Sleep May Cause Relationship Problems: Research

Insufficient sleep has a serious impact on several areas of our lives. When we feel tired, we tend to perform poorly at work and have difficulty fulfilling our responsibilities as parents. New research suggests we can also have trouble meeting the needs of our partners, who may experience resentment in return.

Showing Appreciation

Research out of University of California, Berkeley, indicates that inadequate sleep can take a big toll on relationships. According to the study, when people fail to get sufficient sleep, they may neglect their partners in ways that make them feel less appreciated.

To reach their findings, researchers looked at 60 couples from 18 to 56 years of age. Each subject kept a daily record of their sleeping habits and their feelings toward their partners. In the end, the study uncovered a link between feelings of negativity between mates and insufficient sleep. To watch this play out, researchers videotaped couples as they performed problem solving tasks. Not surprisingly, tired participants showed less appreciation for their partners, suggesting that inadequate sleep may make it difficult for people to satisfy the needs of their mates.

How it Applies to Sleep Apnea

Since breathing problems keep them up at night, sleep apneics are particularly susceptible to the negative effects of inadequate sleep. According to this new research, these may include relationship problems that could causes marital discord. What’s more, insufficient sleep has been associated with serious medical issues, such as cancer, heart disease and more.

Reaching Out for Help

If you are enduring the trying symptoms associated with sleep apnea, it’s time to get help. Dr. Siegel can provide lasting sleep apnea relief that can put a permanent end to the breathing difficulties that promote frequent waking. If you are searching for sleep apnea relief; help is just a phone call away. Contact Dr. Siegel’s office today.

Related article: http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/poor-sleep-sink-relationship-study-article-1.1243981